Why Does My Clit Hurt After Sex?

Many things can cause clit pain, from rough fingering to penetration before adequate lubrication. Some people have a hypersensitive clit due to the bundles of nerves that are there.

But the point is, sex shouldn’t hurt, and there are ways to prevent it. Here are some of the most common reasons your clit might hurt: 1. You weren’t aroused enough before sex.

Lack of lubrication

When you’re sexually aroused, your body produces natural lubrication to reduce friction. Unfortunately, it’s not always enough, especially if you don’t take the time to get in the mood for sex, rush into things or use a sex toy that’s not properly lubricated.

If you have a lot of friction going on, it can cause the sensitive tissue of your clitoris or vulva to hurt and burn. But if you’re not sure what caused the friction to begin with, it could be an underlying health issue that should be checked out by your GP, such as an infection or a condition like yeast infections and some sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

In some cases, changes in hormone levels can also make your vagina dry and create friction, leading to pain and soreness during and after sex. This can be due to perimenopause or menopause, as well as hormonal birth control or medication. This can be prevented by using lots of lube, foreplay and spending some extra time focusing on relaxation during sex.

You should also try to avoid sex toys that are made of latex, as these can trigger allergies. Instead, look for condoms and lubricants that are made of polyurethane, which is nonlatex and still helps prevent both disease and pregnancy.

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Tight clothing

When you wear tight clothing, it puts pressure on the clitoris. This irritates the sensitive tissue and can cause pain. You may be able to relieve this by switching to looser clothing or adding more lubrication to your sexual experiences.

Your genitals can also get itchy for a variety of reasons. Sometimes this is a sign of an infection, such as trichomoniasis or bacterial vaginosis (BV). If you’re experiencing itching or itchiness around your vulva that doesn’t respond to extra lubrication or gentler sexual interactions, consider contacting a healthcare professional.

Tight clothing can also raise your body temperature and encourage the growth of bacteria. This can lead to problems like yeast infections and thrush, which are common in the vulva.

The clitoral hood contains many nerve endings, which makes it vulnerable to irritation from friction and pressure. This can be caused by anything from tight pants to a cotton swab or even by touching the vestibule. Some women experience a chronic form of clitoral pain known as vestibulodynia, which can trigger a variety of symptoms, including sharp, throbbing, or burning sensations. Vestibulodynia is often triggered by touch, including sexual contact, wearing tight clothing, and moving at certain angles.

While sex should never hurt, it’s normal to experience some pain and tenderness after a good romp. If your clit is sore after sex, however, it’s important to figure out why so you can treat the problem before it gets worse.

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Stuck hair under the clitoral hood

Hair growing on your genital area is normal, but sometimes small splinters of hair can become stuck underneath the clitoral hood. This can cause the hood to get irritated and swollen, and can lead to pain after sex or masturbation. It can also happen due to trauma, such as a slight scratch or rough touch while playing with your genitals.

The glans of the clitor are what most people think of when they hear “clit.” This external nub holds thousands of nerve endings and is extremely sensitive, making it an important part of the orgasm. But the glans are just the tip of the iceberg — the clitoral hood, which looks like the hood of your sweatshirt, is what protects it and shields it from abrasions.

When lubrication is adequate, the hood can easily slide over the glans. However, if the hood is not lubricated enough, it can stick to the glans, which creates friction. This can lead to painful clitoral adhesion, or “clitoral entrapment,” says Dr. Twogood.

Some people might find stroking or massaging the clitoral hood feels good, particularly with a little lube. Some might even prefer to play with it directly. You can try rubbing the hood with your fingers, or even a fingertip vibrator, for heightened pleasure. You can also flick the hood gently for sudden sparks of sensation.

An underlying medical condition

If you experience severe pain after sex, it could be an indicator of an underlying medical condition. If the soreness is severe and lasts longer than a few hours, contact your health care provider right away.

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The pain may be a symptom of a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Other symptoms of an STI include itching and a rash in the vulva area. Your gynecologist can recommend treatments that may help alleviate the symptoms.

Vaginal soreness after sex can also be caused by hormonal changes, especially if you’re pregnant, entering menopause or in the perimenopausal stage. Those fluctuations can cause the clitoral hood to become dry, leading to friction, which in turn can lead to pain and discomfort. To relieve this, you can try adding lubrication to your nightly routine or soak in a tub with Epsom salts. Just make sure you don’t apply the salts directly to your vulva, as this can irritate it more.

Another possible cause of clitoral pain is a chronic condition called vulvodynia. This is pain in the vulvar and external genital areas, including the clitoral hood. The pain can be provoked by tight clothing or touch, but it can also be unprovoked. Treatment for clitorodynia includes oral tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline and nortriptyline, or anticonvulsants like Neurontin and Lyrica. These medications work by numbing nerves and can significantly decrease the clitoral pain.

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