Why Does My Cervix Hurt After Sex?

Picture this: You’re having sex with your partner, then you feel pain during or after penetration. This may be caused by your cervix hitting against your pelvic floor muscles or other factors.

A bruised cervix can be painful and uncomfortable, but it’s not usually a sign of long term trouble. Keep your cervix healthy with regular Pap smears and by eating plenty of vitamins A, E, and C.

Causes

Bruising your cervix doesn’t usually mean anything long term, but it may feel like a smack in the face (or vaginal whiplash). It usually occurs during deep penetration, such as when you use a penis or dildo. It can also happen when you hold yourself in a doggy-style position while having sex.

It’s not uncommon for people to bruise their cervix in sexual positions they find uncomfortable or when they aren’t adequately aroused. But it’s important to communicate with your partner and try different positions that allow for less painful penetration or more control over the depth – This section was prepared by the website hotsexyandbigtits.com. Adding lubricant can also help reduce friction.

If your pain is recurring, talk to your doctor or gynecologist about it. It’s possible that a persistent injury could cause pelvic inflammatory disease, or PID. This can be caused by STIs such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, and trichomoniasis.

PID can lead to pelvic pain, spotting, bloody discharge, lower abdominal pain, or a quarter-sized or larger clot in your menstrual blood. If you have this problem, a doctor will prescribe antibiotics to treat the infection and possibly some other medications. They may also recommend that you take a break from having sex until your cervix heals. However, the pain should go away on its own if you don’t re-injure it. It’s best to avoid sex for one or two days to let the area heal, but you should be able to get back into it when your cervix feels better.

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Symptoms

Bruising of the cervix can feel different for each person, but it usually involves an aching sensation deep inside that may get worse during penetration. Pain and tenderness will probably last a few days or even a week, but it should fade on its own. It’s best to avoid penetration until the pain goes away, especially if you had painful sex initially that caused it.

If you do have a bruised cervix, you can take over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen or naproxen to help with the symptoms. If the pain and tenderness are severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor. They can do a pelvic exam to make sure the injury isn’t more serious than you think or check for complications, like an IUD that moved during sex.

In the future, focus on sex that feels pleasurable for both you and your partner. That could mean experimenting with sex positions that allow you to control the depth of penetration and using a lubricant to ensure your partner can reach all the way down. Most of all, communicate with your partner so you both know what’s okay and what isn’t, and work together to avoid painful sex in the future. You don’t want any more injuries from this part of your body!

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Treatment

Depending on the severity of the injury, symptoms can range from painful cramps to a general aching feeling inside your body or lower abdomen. You should avoid vaginal penetration until the pain subsides, and if it continues to hurt with intercourse or penetration you should visit your OB/GYN.

This condition is called cervical ectropion, and it means that your glandular cells are found on the outside of your cervix instead of in the middle like they should be. The condition may be caused by prior surgeries, childbirth injuries or even anxiety disorders.

Vaginismus can also cause the same painful sensations as a bruised cervix, and it’s the result of your muscles involuntarily tightening during penetration (whether from a penis, hand or dildo). This condition can be caused by an underlying medical issue, such as an overactive bladder, or psychological issues, such as anxiety or PTSD.

If you experience this condition, you can take over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen or naproxen to ease the discomfort and speed up the healing process. You can also apply a heating pad to your abdomen and back for relief, and wear loose clothing to alleviate pressure on your stomach and pelvic area. It’s also important to try different sexual positions to see what feels best for you. As with any injury, it’s best to stay hydrated so drink plenty of fluids.

Prevention

It’s always best to prevent cervical trauma in the first place. To do this, be open with your partner about how you want to have sex and don’t be afraid to speak up when something is wrong or uncomfortable. Try sexual positions that allow you to have more control over the penetration depth and rhythm, like cowgirl or reverse cowgirl, as well as use lube to reduce friction. Additionally, be sure to seek medical attention if you experience severe pain during penetration, soak through a tampon every hour or have quarter-sized or larger clots in your menstrual blood.

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If you injure your cervix, the most obvious symptom is pain during and after penetration. But other symptoms can include spotting, a change in the texture and position of your cervix, cramping and back pain. Injuries to the cervix can be exacerbated by certain sexually transmitted infections, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea.

The amount of pain you experience varies from person to person, but some women say it feels like being poked on the inside with a hot poker or even worse than their period pain. Depending on the severity of your injury, over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen and naproxen (Aleve), may help soothe the pain while it heals. It’s also important to avoid penetrative masturbation until the bruising is gone, as it can prolong the healing process.

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