Why Does My Pee Burn After Sex?

We’ve all been there: You sit on the toilet and suddenly you feel a burning sensation as you pee. It’s not only uncomfortable, but it can be a sign of something serious.

Women tend to get UTIs more often than men because their bodies’ ureters, bladders and urethra are more sensitive. Luckily, most infections can be treated with antibiotics if caught early.

Urinary Tract Infection

It’s not a good feeling when you sit on the toilet and pee, only to realize that it hurts. This pain, known as dysuria, is a sign that your bladder and/or the tube that carries pee out of your body (the urethra) have been infected.

You can develop a UTI for many reasons that have nothing to do with sex, like pregnancy, diabetes, or certain medications. Your body may also become irritated when you douche (use a vaginal rinse) that contains fragrances or that throws off the balance of your natural pH in your bladder.

Depending on your age, the symptoms of a UTI can range from mild to severe – These data are a result of the service editorial team’s work https://sexynlive.com. You can have a bladder infection or an infection in the skin around your genitals, including the bladder opening (urethra), penis (if you’re a man) or behind your pubic bone (if you’re a woman).

You may also have a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that causes painful peeing after sex, such as herpes, chlamydia, or trichomoniasis. These infections can lead to pelvic pain and a burning sensation when you pee. If you have these STIs, your doctor will give you antibiotics to treat them. If you’re not sure what type of STI you have, talk to your ob-gyn or health care provider. They can do a few tests to figure out what’s causing your symptoms.

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Prostate Infection

The prostate is a walnut-sized gland that sits near your bladder and the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the penis). It may be infected with bacteria, which could cause pain during or after sex. This is called bacterial prostatitis. It can be acute or chronic.

Your doctor can diagnose a prostate infection by doing a physical exam and asking questions about your symptoms. He or she will also examine your genital area and look for signs of infection, such as pain during urination or bleeding from the vulva or rectum.

Men are more likely to get a prostate infection than women because of the structure of their bodies. The prostate gland is larger in men than in women, and they have a shorter urethra. Women, on the other hand, tend to have shorter urethras and more internal organs in the vagina.

If your pain and burning are severe, you might have a more serious condition that needs treatment, like an STI or UTI. The STIs that can cause painful peeing after sex include herpes, chlamydia, and gonorrhea.

If you have a mild case of a prostate infection, your doctor might suggest some lifestyle changes or medication to help reduce the inflammation. For example, he might recommend you use the bathroom more often and eat foods that are high in fiber. He might also prescribe a pill or topical cream to treat the infection.

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Skin Irritation

Painful urination after sex can be a real bummer. Depending on the cause, it can be as minor as irritation to your skin around the area, or more serious like a urinary tract infection (UTI). Both men and women can experience pain when they pee after sex, but it’s most common in women. That’s because their bodies have a different setup, with a vagina and urethra that are more easily irritated than the penis.

Yeast infections, for example, can lead to itching and burning in the vagina, a cottage cheese-like discharge, and sex pain. If you have a yeast infection, antifungal medications can help treat it. Pain when you pee after sex can also occur in your penis, although it’s more likely to be caused by internal injuries from sex or a reaction to lubricants or condoms, which can rub against the urethra and cause abrasions.

If you’re experiencing burning when you pee after sex, try using more lubrication and switching up positions during intercourse. If you have an allergy or sensitivity to a lubricant, try a different one without perfumes and flavors. And, if you and your partner have latex allergies, switch to nonlatex condoms. Of course, even if you use protection, peeing after sex doesn’t prevent pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections (STIs). If you have concerns, talk to your doctor.

STIs

You may also feel burning or stinging when peeing after sex because you have an infection in your bladder or the tube that carries pee out of your body (the urethra). This can be caused by sexually transmitted infections like chlamydia, herpes and trichomoniasis. It’s important to get STIs diagnosed and treated right away if you have risk factors, such as unprotected sex or having multiple partners. They can be treated with antibiotics and usually don’t lead to serious health complications if caught early.

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A yeast infection, which is typically accompanied by itching and thick white discharge, can also cause painful or burning pee after sex. It is typically easy to treat with over-the-counter or prescription medications, and will relieve symptoms of painful pee after sex quickly.

Finally, painful or burning when you pee after sex could be caused by irritation to your skin or genital area due to the use of an inappropriate condom, lubricant or spermicide, or because of a sensitivity to soaps and douches. If you have tried a few different lubricants and spermicides and still have pain when you pee, talk to your primary care doctor or ob-gyn about what is causing the issue.

Your doctor will ask you a lot of personal questions about your sexual history, which may make you uncomfortable at first. However, it is important that you are honest so that you can receive the appropriate treatment. They may take a sample of fluid from your vagina or penis or conduct a blood test to diagnose an infection and determine the appropriate course of action.

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