How to Avoid Hitching the Cervix During Sex

A cervix is a part of your body that sits between your vaginal canal and your uterus. It’s about 3-7 inches from your vaginal opening and can be bruised during deep penetration with a penis or other object during sex.

Bruising your cervix may cause pain, bleeding, spotting and back pain. It’s best to play safe and use plenty of lube when exploring.

What is the cervix?

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, or womb. It’s shaped like a neck, and it connects the inside of your vagina to the body of the uterus. The cervix also opens during sexual intercourse and stretches during childbirth to allow a baby to pass through. It’s an important part of the female reproductive system and is essential for women’s health. The cervix keeps bacteria out of the uterus, produces discharge to help clean your vagina and can open and close to facilitate or protect pregnancy. It’s important to get regular Pap smears and keep an eye on the shape of your cervix for signs of cancer, which can be treated if caught early – This section is the result of the website team’s efforts Sex Holes.

The outer part of the cervix is called the ectocervical canal and is lined with a type of skin-like tissue called stratified squamous non-keratinized epithelium. The inner part of the cervix is called endocervical canal and is lined by mucus-secreting simple columnar epithelium. The cervix opens up to allow sperm to enter the uterus during the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle around ovulation, and it shrinks back down afterward.

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The cervix can feel very different to touch at different times of the month. It can be soft and slightly open (like the ear lobe) or firm and closed. It can also be positioned higher up in the abdomen or lower down in the pelvis. These changes in cervical height are a normal part of the menstrual cycle, and they can influence how deep vaginal penetration feels.

How do I know if I’m hitting the cervix?

Cervical stimulation can feel pleasurable for some people but may not for others. It is important to communicate openly with your partner and focus on foreplay before sexual penetration, especially when it involves the cervix.

For some women, touching the cervix feels like being gut-punched and can cause pain and cramping that’s similar to period pains. This sensation typically occurs with deep, vigorous penetrative sex when a penis, fist, or other object repeatedly hits against the cervix.

If you are hitting the cervix, it is important to stop as soon as possible to avoid causing pain and discomfort for your partner. It can also be helpful to try different positions for sex that decrease the depth of penetration, such as Ohnut or pelvic gynecology positions.

The cervix is located at the back of the vaginal canal and can feel firm and stiff like the tip of your nose, or softer and more spongy depending on hormones. If you’re unfamiliar with the feeling, try putting one or two clean or gloved fingers (with lube) into your vagina and moving your hand up and down in a circular motion. You should feel your cervix move along with this motion. Bruising the cervix can cause a dull ache that feels similar to period pain and often comes with the urge to urinate. If you are noticing that your cervix is bruised after sexual intercourse, it is important to visit a doctor for a pelvic exam and determine if there is another reason for this frequent bruising, such as an infection.

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How can I avoid hitting the cervix?

The good news is that cervix bruising usually doesn’t require medical attention. However, it can still be uncomfortable for both partners. The key to avoiding a cervix injury is to be aware of how deep you’re penetrating your partner and to use more lube, particularly if you are using a dildo or other hard object. Spending time on foreplay and making sure your partner is fully aroused before you begin penetration can also help.

A bruised cervix will feel sensitive and tender, similar to cramps, she says. The pain will most likely be intensified with sexual arousal, she adds, as the vagina stretches to make it easier for a penis or other object to penetrate. Some people are more prone to cervical injuries than others, she notes, because of the position of their cervix and uterus. Those who have a shallower vagina or cervix will also be more prone to injury.

The good news is that a cervix that has been bruised through vigorous penetrative sex doesn’t typically need treatment. The pain should taper within a day or two, and the injury shouldn’t cause any long term problems. But if you do experience persistent or severe pain, reach out to your health care provider to see if there is a medical reason for it such as a pelvic infection like chlamydia or gonorrhea.

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What should I do if I’m hitting the cervix?

While cervical pain isn’t super common, it can happen and is no fun. Luckily, there are things you can do to prevent cervical penetration injuries in the future. One is to avoid rough sex around times when your cervix is lower, such as during and after your period. Another is to make sure you’re sufficiently aroused before vaginal penetration. That’s because the cervix is lower and harder to hit when you aren’t aroused. Using lots of foreplay and lubrication can also help, as these will decrease friction between your penis or dildo and the ectocervix (aka your C-spot).

It’s also important to try sexual positions that promote shallow penetration, such as standing up, being on top, or spooning. Lastly, it’s a good idea to talk to your pelvic health provider about any chronic cervical pain you have, as that may be a sign of other issues that need to be addressed.

If you do end up with a bruised cervix, it should hurt immediately and make further penetration uncomfortable until it heals. If the pain continues to linger or you notice any other signs of injury, such as bleeding, then it’s time to visit your doctor. This may be a sign of something serious, like an infection or pelvic inflammatory disease. Getting checked out early will help you find the right treatment for you.

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