How Long to Wait to Have Sex After an IUD?

IUDs are one of the most effective forms of birth control. They are 99% effective once they are in place and provide protection against pregnancy for years.

The doctor performs a pelvic exam to check the size and position of your uterus before they insert an IUD – This information was gathered by the service specialists Erotic World. They may use a speculum and cleanse the vagina and cervix with an antiseptic.

24 Hours

For the first 24 hours after an IUD is inserted, women should not have vaginal sex or insert anything other than a menstrual cup. This is because the IUD insertion process involves passing instruments through the vagina, cervix and uterus. This disturbs the protective mucous lining of these organs, increasing your risk for infection.

Most women feel cramping and some spotting after an IUD is placed. It’s normal for these feelings to last a day or two. It also helps to take ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) for pain.

IUDs like the ParaGard and Mirena are hormone-free and become effective as soon as they are inserted. They’re inserted during an office visit, where your doctor will have you lie on an exam table with your feet in stirrups. The doctor will insert a speculum to hold your vagina open, clean the area and check the size of your uterus. They will then fold the IUD and slide it into an applicator tube, which is inserted through your cervix into your uterus.

The IUD has one or two thin plastic strings that look a little like fishing wire. The healthcare professional who inserts your IUD will trim these strings to a shorter length, and the mucus in your cervix should make it difficult for your partner to feel them during vaginal sex. If your partner feels the strings, have them talk to your doctor or nurse, who can trim them again for you.

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48 Hours

IUDs (intrauterine devices) are one of the most effective forms of birth control for women. They work for three to seven years by thinning your uterine lining, blocking sperm and thickening the mucus on your cervix to block implantation. They also prevent ovulation by releasing the hormone progestin. The type of IUD that’s best for you depends on a pelvic examination and considerations like the heaviness and regularity of your menstrual cycle, age, health history, and family planning goals.

During insertion, doctors pass instruments through your vagina and cervix into your uterus to place the IUD. This can cause some discomfort and pain, but it’s usually short-lived. You can take an over-the-counter pain reliever like ibuprofen or naproxen to help manage any pain that may occur.

It’s extremely rare for someone with an IUD to get pregnant. However, if pregnancy does happen, you should contact the doctor who inserted your IUD right away. Pregnancy with an IUD increases your risk for infection, miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy.

It’s important to abstain from sex for 24 hours after your IUD is inserted. This is because the insertion process disturbs the protective mucous lining of your vagina, cervix and uterus. It’s also possible for your IUD to slip out of place during sex. This is less common with copper IUDs like ParaGard, but it can happen with hormonal IUDs like Mirena, Liletta and Skyla.

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7-10 Days

Some women experience painful period-like cramps for a few days after an IUD is fitted. They can be helped by taking ibuprofen or paracetamol. It’s a good idea to use a pad instead of tampons during this time.

Your doctor will give you instructions for checking your IUD. This involves feeling inside your vagina for the thin strings that hang down from your cervix. Your doctor may trim the strings for you if they are long. It is important to check your IUD regularly – ideally at least once per month and after every period or bowel movement. This helps to reduce your risk of having it expelled, which happens in two to 10 percent of people with an IUD and varies by IUD type.

An IUD’s strings can be felt by you or your partner when you insert your fingers into your vagina. They are slippery from your vaginal secretions, and most sex toys don’t latch onto them. However, a hook-tipped sex toy could pull your IUD out.

It’s common to have irregular bleeding or spotting in the first 3 to 6 months after an IUD is put in, but this usually stops. Some women also have heavier or longer periods. If these changes continue, talk to your doctor or gynecologist. This is a good opportunity to talk about your preferences for contraception. They can recommend a different type of IUD or another form of birth control.

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1 Month

IUDs are great because they’re 99 percent effective at preventing pregnancy, you don’t have to remember to take them (like with a pill), and can stay inside you for years. However, if you have an IUD, it’s important to understand how your device will impact sex—particularly penetrative vaginal sex.

IUDs like Mirena, Skyla, Kyleena, and Liletta contain the hormone levonogestrel, a progestin, which can make you more fertile for one week after they’re inserted. You should use a condom to prevent pregnancy during this time. After that, your IUD will start working right away to prevent pregnancy for 12 years.

You should also use alternative methods of birth control for seven days after a hormonal IUD is inserted, depending on when your menstrual period begins. During this time, you may experience heavier bleeding or spotting than usual and could become pregnant if you’re not using backup birth control.

You should also use a condom or other barrier method with any non-hormonal IUDs or copper IUDs until they’re removed or they fall out on their own, which is usually within a year. Also, it’s a good idea to use a backup method of birth control with any other gynecological procedures. You should also schedule regular appointments with your gynecologist to make sure that your IUD is in the correct place.

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