Anus Sex After Giving Birth

Considering it took nine months to grow your baby, having anal sex is probably the last thing on your mind postpartum. However, most doctors recommend waiting six weeks before engaging in any type of penetrative sex after childbirth.

That includes oral sex and masturbation, too – This quote is a consequence of the website editorial team’s analysis https://sexybaccarax.com. And remember, there’s a decrease in oestrogen after childbirth, so lube is your friend.

Vaginal Infections

There are different types of vaginal infections, and the symptoms can look very similar — a tingling sensation, a thick discharge with a fishy odor, pain when you urinate or have sex. It’s not always easy to figure out what’s going on, but if you get any of these symptoms and haven’t had a C-section, it’s time to contact your doctor for a checkup and treatment.

Vaginal infections occur when there is a change in the balance of yeast and bacteria that normally live in the vagina. This can be caused by hormonal changes during pregnancy, labor and delivery or antibiotics used to help during childbirth. Certain medical conditions, such as diabetes or HIV infection, can also increase a woman’s risk for a vaginal infection.

The most common vaginal infection is bacterial vaginosis, or BV. This is caused when “friendly” bacteria that normally live in the vagina, called lactobacilli, are reduced and replaced by harmful bacteria. Other causes include changing sexual partners or douching, long periods of exposure to moisture, poor hygiene and irritants, such as perfumed soaps or sprays, or wearing tight-fitting clothing.

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Another type of vaginal infection is a yeast infection, or candidiasis. These are caused by the fungus Candida albicans and can happen in warm, moist areas, such as the mouth and vagina. The symptoms of a yeast infection are itching and a sticky, whitish or gray-colored discharge.

C-Section Incisions

Women with C-section incisions may experience numbness around the site, and this can last weeks or months. Numbness is normal, but you should be sure to tell your practitioner if it gets to the point that it interferes with your daily activities.

Itching is also common for many C-section scars, and this can continue for a long time for some women. Itching should not be a major concern, but you should call your doctor immediately if you notice a rash near the site, extreme pain, redness, swelling, foul-smelling discharge or a fever.

You should avoid putting anything inside your vaginal canal until your doctor gives you the okay, typically about six weeks after delivery. Support your abdomen when you sneeze, cough or laugh so that the incision isn’t forced open. Keep the area clean and change your bandage when it gets wet or dirty. Use Steri-Strips if they were used to close your c-section and pat the site dry after showering. If you have a shelf of skin that hangs over the incision, ask your doctor about using cornstarch to keep it dry and free of infection.

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Climatic Stimulation

Most women don’t experience an orgasm during their first postpartum sex, even if they used to climax regularly before pregnancy. This can be caused by a number of things, including a decrease in oestrogen levels and the presence of lochia. It can also be caused by pain or pressure from a vaginal tear or episiotomy, which are common after giving birth.

It’s important to take it slow, maybe trying oral sex or mutual masturbation before you attempt penetrative sex again. And remember to keep some lubricant handy, as your vagina will be drier after childbirth.

Some couples resume lovemaking immediately after the baby is born, which is called sex without intercourse (Bing & Colman, 1977; Hooper, 1992; Kitzinger, 1981). This is where the man puts his penis between the woman’s thighs and they oscillate with passion, though they don’t penetrate each other. This can help to alleviate sexual anxiety for the new mother and her partner.

Butt Stuff

We’re not going to get too graphic, but it’s worth mentioning that there’s a lot going on south of your naval after you’ve had a baby. If you delivered vaginally, you may have suffered a perineal tear or an episiotomy, which is essentially when your doctor cuts the bit of real estate between your vagina and your anus to give your little one some room as they come out into this crazy world.

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These injuries can be a pain when it comes to anal sex, but they’re usually temporary. The trick is to be gentle with whatever you do and use protective barriers like tampons or sex toys (preferably those meant for anal, as your regular dildos or plugs might not work) to keep everything clean and free of bacteria that could move between the two areas and cause infection.

It’s also important to note that it takes some time to adjust to your new anatomy and figure out how your body wants to do anal sex. Remember, it’s not a “lesser form of sex” and your partner is not a mind reader so don’t hesitate to speak up if anything feels uncomfortable or painful. It’s also a good idea to practice solo with butt stuff to make sure you’re comfortable with it before asking your partner for a feel-good experience.

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Tomasz

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